Turbocharging engines have revolutionized the capability of piston powered aircraft, allowing them to operate at high altitudes with ease. As air pressure and density decreases as an aircraft rises higher above sea-level, aircraft typically lose engine power the higher they climb. To offset this effect, aircraft manufacturers often implement turbochargers within the engine, allowing for air to be compressed to a higher density before being mixed with fuel for combustion. In this blog, we will discuss the history of the turbocharger, as well as how they compare to other turbos such as superchargers.


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The crankcase is the housing for the crankshaft within a reciprocating internal combustion engine. In most modern engines, the crankcase is integrated into the engine block. Two-stroke engines use a crankcase compression design which results in the fuel/air mixture passing through the crankcase before entering the cylinders. In this configuration, the crankcase does not include an oil sump. In four-stroke engines, the crankcase features an oil sump at the bottom, with most of the engine’s oil being held in the crankcase. The fuel/air mixture does not pass through the crankcase in a four-stroke engine, though a modicum of exhaust gases commonly enter as residual blow-by from the combustion chamber.


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